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Gardens in Edinburgh and The Lothians

Amisfield Walled Garden

Dating from the late 18th Century it is one of the largest walled gardens in Scotland with extensive herbaceous borders, fruit and vegetable beds, wildflower meadow, orchard and woodland plantings. Amisfield is a community garden managed by the Amisfield Preservation Trust and a large band of volunteers during four volunteering sessions each week. It provides a venue for education and training for people of all abilities. The garden is becoming increasingly popular as a visitor destination, with well over 1,000 people visiting each year. The woodland and meadow surrounding the garden are popular with local walkers.

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Dirleton Castle and Gardens - HES

Cross the deep moat guarded by high walls and an imposing tower and discover stories of sieges, nobility and witchcraft in this stunning castle. Direlton is also however celebrated for the beauty of its grounds and idyllic setting. The gardens that grace the castle grounds today date from the late 1800s and early 1900s.Fragrant herbaceous borders greet you as you enter the estate. These belong to the beautiful north garden, which dates from the Arts and Crafts movement of the 1920s The formal Victorian west garden – with its foliage plants and geraniums – was faithfully reconstructed in 1993 and is at its most impressive in September. This year one of the garden’s 24 year old monkey puzzle tree’s finally produced cucumber shaped cones showing it to be a male.

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House of the Binns

Set in beautifully landscaped parkland, this House overlooks the River Forth. Home to the Dalyell family for 400 years, this was built in 1612 by Thomas Dalyell. The Scottish Renaissance painted wood decoration is a rare and beautiful survival from the earliest period of the house. Outside the grounds are painstakingly beautiful with plenty of plantings to be seen.

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Inveresk Lodge Garden

This delightful hillside garden is awaiting your discovery. Tucked away within stone boundary walls you will find tall trees, fragrant flowers, songbirds and clear water. In the charming village of Inveresk, there is a heady mix of rare and familiar scents - a wonderful sensory experience.

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Malleny Garden

Renowned for its peaceful atmosphere, Malleny is the place to come for quiet contemplation. Through a decorated wrought-iron gate the walled garden opens out, enclosing sculpted beds with sprays of colour. With wooden benches dotted throughout the garden, this is a perfect place to sit and take in the beautiful surroundings.

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Newhailes

This estate is an amazing survival story, allowing you to experience dignified 17th century settings. A unique achievement of this property is its committed conservation, much of it untouched by modern hands. Outside there is exciting restoration undergoing including the flower garden, kitchen garden, ha-ha and formal lawns.

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Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

The Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh is one of the world’s leading Botanic Gardens. Visitors can discover the Garden’s fascinating history dating back over 300 years, learn about its plants and trees and walk around 70 acres of beautiful landscape. A pleasure for all the family, the Garden offers a fantastic view of the capital’s skyline featuring Edinburgh Castle and is located just a mile from the city centre. The Garden’s 10 magnificent Glasshouses have different climatic zones, from steamy tropics to arid desert, and are home to over 3,000 exotic plants from around the world. The Glasshouse visit is paid for admission for adults (£5.50), concession (£4.50) and these prices include a small donation to the Garden. Members and children under 16 go free.

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Scotland's Gardens Scheme

Scotland's Gardens helps private individuals open their gardens to the public. The money raised is then distributed to a wide range of charities, including Maggies' Cancer Caring Centres, the NTS Gardens Fund, the Queen's Nursing Institute Scotland and Perennial.

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St Mary's Pleasance

St Mary’s Pleasance is a heritage walled garden adjacent to the church, covering 0.65hectare. The garden provides a unique green space close to the centre of the town. It was created in the 1970's with the design and plants reflecting the features of a 17th century Scottish garden, as would have been associated with the adjoining Haddington House which dates from 1648. Hedgehog, field mouse, grey squirrel, toad, and many varieties of birds have been recorded. Mallard, wood pigeon, collared dove and several species of smaller birds regularly nest in the garden. To augment the natural habitats, bird and bat boxes have been introduced. The wild flower meadow and the cottage garden attract bees, wasps, butterflies, beetles and other insects. It is a private garden owned by the Haddington Garden Trust, and is managed for the benefit of the community which has access to it all year round.

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